wetland bird survey – swans and sunshine

When I make the half-hour drive to my survey patch, I will often see flocks of Starlings pass over head, all coming from the direction of the Somerset Levels. When there are several hundred they will be strung out in a long line, flying low across the fields, up over the hedges and roads and on to their feeding grounds. Last weekend was no exception, and given it was also a beautiful sunny morning, it felt like a promising day for seeing birds.

A month ago I saw less than a hundred Lapwings for the whole count, but as I arrived it was evident that it would be different on this occasion. As I got my wellies on a flock of about 60 Lapwings flew overhead, their curious calls filling the air. The water in the River Sowy and Langacre Rhyne was high, just about breaking the bank. Here, there were the usual suspects – a handful of Mute Swans and Cormorants. There is scrub and long grass on the banks which play host to Stonechats, and there were several visible, all very noisy.

I covered this first section on foot, and part way along my route a pair of Roe deer watched me from the far side of a field. Evidently my presence proved too much; off they went, their tail flashes showing up bright in the sunshine. Perhaps this was the same pair that I saw here last month? In the bushes beside me a Cetti’s warbler gave song – always startlingly loud. I sometimes wonder if they surprise themselves with the volume of their voice.

On this part of the site I have to cross two bridges. There are often birds here, and with little cover available, caution is required if they are not to be spooked. As I approached, there suddenly seemed to be birds everywhere. A flock of about 160 Lapwings took off from a field adjacent to the river took. Several Mallards passed overhead. I could hear Teal calling – there were 20 or so upstream – and numerous swans populated the river banks further downstream.

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Three swans flew past, following the line of the river. Initially I just noted down the number, but as an after thought I had a quick look through the binoculars. I’m glad I did as the different shape and colouring of their beaks revealed them to be Whooper swans. I have access to the survey records for this site going back to 2000, and looking through later on I could see no previous instance of the species. In addition this was a lifer for me, so on two counts that already made the day a bit special.

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Larger numbers of Lapwings gather in the fields adjacent to one of the roads that cuts across the site. I can scan these from the roadside, but it takes some time to cover as there are anything up to several hundred in each field, and careful counting is required. Here also were Golden Plovers, the other species that gather in large numbers. In one field there were approximately 1500, and along with a flock of Lapwings, they took flight, giving a wonderful swirling display. When they wheel and turn they look like a shoal of fish, the sunlight catching their paler plumage.

As I drove between two viewpoints I noticed a couple of egrets in amongst some cattle. Were these Cattle egrets? After parking, I used my scope to have a better look and sure enough, this was certainly what they were. This was my second lifer of the day, and again, another species that is not in the records I have access to.

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Cattle egrets have been showing up on the Somerset Levels for some years now, with Catcott Lows seeming to be a particular hotspot for them. In 2008 they bred here on the Levels for the first time on record in the UK, after an influx the previous year. It will be interesting to see if they show up again on my patch over the winter.

In the same way that it is somehow reassuring when the Swallows return in spring, it was good to see the Lapwings and Golden Plovers back here in numbers. In all there were 1450 and 3000 respectively- double the numbers present the same time last year. This count was particularly enjoyable – nice weather, new species and the spectacle of large numbers of birds in flight. What’s not to like?

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