a following wind

Sunday afternoon, a couple of weeks ago, the storm has blown through, a rearguard of cloud moves away to the east. Overhead, a bright blue sky and rag ends of clouds caught on a stiff northerly breeze.

Looking up on the off chance, a habit.

Half a dozen or so swallows fly over, purposeful, direct, southbound.

It gives me an idea. Equipped with binoculars, a chair, and an hour ahead of me, I install myself at the end of the garden where I have a clear view of the sky. Check the time and wait. It doesn’t take long – another small flock, heading the same way, south, and the same focused flight, intent. Minutes later another group. And another.

I watch for an hour, and over the course of that time I count 142 swallows and 12 house martins. Not a huge number by any means, but a near constant flow. In all, 32 groups pass over, ranging from lone birds to 20 or more, so on average every 2 minutes. Unlike the interweaving flight of resident feeding swallows, they are all flying in one direction. This behaviour suggests that with the wind in the right direction, and more than 9000 kilometres to go, this is an opportunity not to be squandered.

So, do migrating birds wait for a following wind? It makes sense, but this is something I need to look into.

Two days later, late afternoon, I watched a group of six swallows skim over the village. And that was the last time. So long until next year.


Last weekend I talk a walk to the copse around sunrise, and the number of Robins was notable – far more than usual. It seemed almost as if every few metres there would be one singing or scolding. I counted 20 over about a kilometre – normally there would be perhaps 5–10. No doubt these will be part of the influx of migrants that overwinter here, so as one lot of visitors are leaving, another are taking their place.

In the copse itself a noisy flock of about 30 Magpies congregated in the tops of the trees – I don’t recall seeing this many at one time before. In the half-light Meadow pipits called as they passed overhead, reminding me that soon the sky will be punctuated by the flight calls of Fieldfares and Redwings. Smaller birds were still relatively quiet, although from time to time, I could see movement in the lower tiers of the trees. Nearby, an alarm call from a wren, and at one point, soft ticking sounds came from within a scrubby bush, and a small flock of Long-tailed tits appeared, moving through the branches like bobbing musical notes.

I reached the high ground that overlooks the copse as the clouds to the east flared momentarily a deep rose-red. With the sun up, daylight quickly increased and with it bird activity. Blue tits, Great tits and Chaffinches started to call to one another as they worked through the Blackthorn scrub on the edge of the copse. Hidden from view, but very close to me I could hear the slightly mournful call of a Bullfinch. Further away, a Chiffchaff haltingly gave song.

Time to walk back, taking in another part of the copse on my way. The blackberries, mostly over now, have been both abundant and delicious. Blackthorn branches are weighed down with sloes, and the Guelder Rose bushes are covered in berries. I hope this means our birds will do well this winter.

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